Thursday, April 14, 2016

REVIEW - DDDD - FRUSTRATION MUSIC - CD

DDDD - FRUSTRATION MUSIC - CD
LOVE EARTH MUSIC/LEM-37
HARSH NOISE/EXPERIMENTAL NOISE/POWER ELECTRONICS
PRO PRESSED CDR IN A JEWEL CASE WITH INSERT.


I.) FRUSTRATION MUSIC:
From what I know about this album it seems like it has 
gotten a pretty negative review or two in the past. Though
this is by no means groundbreaking or innovative music...I
do feel that it is a pretty good release given what it is.
DDDD create extremely lo-fi Harsh Noise soundscapes that 
from what the title suggests are supposed to be themed around
frustration. If this is how frustration translates into music
for the artist then that should be enough. Music is all about
expression, Especially Noise music. So this title track takes
us into nearly nine minutes of a miserably self loathing sound-
scape. Spoken samples of a female discussing her own self hatred
are heard as dense claustrophobic sub-bass drones slowly build.
Blown out windswept textures carry in murky bass currents that 
grow into dreary moaning ambiance. Feedback and high end signals
ring in the air like exhausted, Stretched out sighs. This stuff
is heavy on the bottom end and has a sludgey quality to it. The
kind of music that makes it feel like the walls are slowly closing
in around you. Distant scrap metal and junk percussion's are added
giving this an oldschool Industrial clatter. In fact the overall
production quality is similar to early Industrial from the late
70's/early 80's. A good way to sum this up would be to call it
audio escapism. Sounds that carry you off into a blurred daydream
type of state. Neither coming nor going. Thoughtless and drifting.
The drones build but never seem to reach a grand finale or climax
so much as just a growing sense of discomfort. Basically, I think
this accomplishes the purpose it was created for. Channeling frustration
into the void.

II.) REDUNDANT EDIFICE:
"Redundant Edifice" is only a few seconds longer than the previous track
and functions in a similar mode. Again we open with what sounds like very 
lo-fi recordings of wind that sound like it was recorded on some small,
Cheap handheld device. Rising static and ascending synth pedal tones ebb
and flow on an upward slant. Dense noise similar to cascading boulders and
tumbling stones is heard over rumbling distortion layers and steam-like bursts.
There are faint traces of melody as well as semi-distant Experimental Noise
elements. Overall it feels both organic and mechanical. Like recordings taken
at a steel mill in the middle of more natural surroundings. There are feelings
of complacency, Normality, Labor and disaster present throughout. Like being
stuck at a redundant job and working away your life as the world around you
falls apart while nothing you do has any impact on it. So once again I'd say
that DDDD hit the nail on the head when it comes to making music based on
feelings of frustration. 

III.) LOSS AVERSION:
Loss is something nobody can avoid. And if one was to try and avert loss,
They'd be more than frustrated when it finally caught up with them. So
thematically we are still on point here. Sonically speaking, We are given
a nearly fifteen minute track to shamble through. The opening tones are
still locked into the same gear as the previous tracks with the addition
of noise experimentation that sounds like power tools or dentist drills
grinding away. Static textures mimick the sound of debris falling off of
the drill site as very minimalist patterns similar to light footfalls form 
tiny rhythms underneath it all. Cyclic, Metallic sounds are heard like a
cement mixer or some similar device mindlessly performing it's pre-determined
task. Scrap percussion's echo through cavernous delay/reverb effects along with
slicing/cutting sounds that lacerate the empty air. Things grow a little more
cacophonous with each passing moment. Strange swirling sounds begin and morph
into what sounds like a small engine flooding over and over again. Blades audibly
whip the air in circular motions and restless distorted patterns struggle against
themselves. Machines buzz and groan as multiple cyclic segments follow one after
another. Once again there is a very labourous vibe to this. Tired and unwilling
but left with no other choice than to work as the clock ticks along with the hours
left in life. High end pulses ring in a maddening stretch. This only grows louder
and more overbearing by the moment. Wavering drones carry this along as everything
becomes an obscurred cloud of sound. When this ceases you hear all of the backing
tones in crystal clarity. This both disrupts and destroys the little dreamlike
comfort you had attained. Back to the dirt and grime we go. Heavy bass tones with
a metallic twang to them pummel us into the ground to end things off.

IV.) I DON'T CARE THAT YOU DON'T CARE/MASTURBATION #5 A QUICKIE TWO:
"I Don't Care..." is close to thirteen minutes in total length and begins
on whining high end frequencies with a slight rhythm to them. Flooding sub-bass
drones and grinding jackhammer patterns creep up on us as what sounds like rusted
metal wheels screeching against a hard surface is heard in the near distance. If
you listen closely you can make out what sounds like very muffled/obscurred radio
transmissions coming from somewhere close but closed off. Feedback builds into an
unapologetic ringing that attempts to dwell within and deprive you of comfort but
there is a resonating hum that persists and causes this to lull you back into oblivion.
Harsh Noise dreariness takes over and stronger feedback is utilized along with some really
cool spacey electronics and wavy synth pedals. By the nine and a half minute mark, Everything
once again oozes frustration. This track is bleeding misery and fatigue by the time it finishes.
Pure static walls and bass cloaked in very dense and jagged distortion are at the helm until all
winds downward in an avalanche to the finish. Eventually this cuts off abruptly offering nothing
but silence.

FRUSTRATION MUSIC SUMS IT UP BETTER THAN I CAN. 
CHECK IT OUT:

6.5/10
-ABATTOIR-

www.loveearthmusic.com

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