Wednesday, October 7, 2015

AN INTERVIEW WITH ABJECTION RITUAL




ABJECTION RITUAL IS THE ONE MAN DEATH INDUSTRIAL 
PROJECT OF D.C. FOCUSING ON THEMES SUCH AS MENTAL 
ILLNESS, EXISTENTIAL DESPAIR, RELIGION, DISEASE AND 
THE WORST ASPECTS OF HUMAN NATURE.GREAT ATTENTION TO 
DETAIL AS WELL AS STELLAR COMPOSITION SKILLS HAVE 
RECENTLY GAINED ABJECTION RITUAL A LOT OF PUBLICITY IN 
THE UNDERGROUND CIRCLES. WITH THE RELEASE OF HIS THIRD 
ALBUM "FUTILITY RITES" ON THE MIGHTY MALIGNANT 
RECORDS, THIS IS SURELY JUST THE BEGINNING.TODAY WE 
TALK TO THE MAN RESPONSIBLE FOR ONE OF MY FAVORITE 
PROJECTS TO EMERGE IN THE DEATH INDUSTRIAL SCENE IN 
SOME TIME AND GET AN INSIGHTFUL LOOK INTO THE 
MECHANICS OF, AND MADNESS THAT IS, ABJECTION RITUAL.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
I am curious to hear what the name "Abjection Ritual"
means to you, If anything.It seems like a moniker 
that's open to many interpretations.To me it seemed 
like social commentary.The music being the "Ritual" 
and the lyrics being your "Abjection's" to the things 
you see and experience in the world around you.Is this 
an accurate interpretation or does it mean something 
entirely different to you personally? Why is it that 
you decided to work under this title and how does it 
sum up the music it represents?

D.C. :
Abjection Ritual started up in February 2013.The name 
came to me after seeing a photo of the BTK killer, 
Dennis Rader, in some weird bondage scenes that were 
self shot inside his home. When I saw these photos, 
one of which was used for the cover of the first self 
titled CDR , "Abjection Ritual" popped into my head. I 
like how it can be open to interpretation and has no 
set or "correct" meaning. I find your interpretation 
to be very interesting and I do see my music as a kind 
of private ritual when I am creating it. One meaning 
of the word Abject "is to cast off" so when used in 
that particular context I am purging myself of 
negative emotions/experiences in a cathartic way, 
although I must admit that I sometimes revel in 
negativity as well. Another meaning is "pathetic, 
disgusting, degrading" which could definitely describe 
some of my behaviors and how I view myself and others. 
I feel Abjection Ritual sums up the sounds/mood/lyrics 
of this project perfectly.



TRAUMATIC STATIC:
Is Abjection Ritual your first musical endeavor or 
have you worked with previous projects or bands? 
How did you discover Noise Music and it's related Sub-
Genres and what was it about these styles that drew 
you in and got you involved with them in the first 
place?

D.C. :
Definitely not my first endeavor. I am 37 so I have 
been making music for twenty years now. In the late 
nineties I discovered Death Industrial/PE via the 
massive catalog that Relapse used to send out and 
got turned on to Brighter Death Now, Megaptera and the 
whole Cold Meat Industry roster. Also, Atrax Morgue, 
Slaughter Productions and Slogun were discovered 
thanks to this catalogue. Another big influence was 
the REsearch Industrial Culture book with Throbbing 
Gristle, SPK, NON etc. The Sounds Of Sadism Comp 
should be mentioned too. I was attracted to the bleak, 
morbid atmospheres and fucked up subject matter. At 
that time I was into death metal, grind, Eyehategod, 
stuff like that so it wasn't too much of a leap. I 
started doing my own four track recordings and had a 
project called Immersed In Filth but never really did 
anything with the material. Looking back, it pretty 
much sucked anyway. After years of playing in many 
different bands, I grew bored of playing guitar and 
was fed up with having to rely on others and playing 
stupid local shows for a bunch of drunk idiots. I also 
was able to finally afford some decent recording gear 
and renewed my interest in industrial/power 
electronics.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
With that interest renewed, so far you have 
accomplished three releases. The second two being 
concept albums. Is this a planned formula for future 
releases or just the way things have turned out so 
far? Also, what is it that you feel Abjection Ritual 
brings to the Death Industrial/Power Electronics scene 
that it may have been lacking? What do you feel you 
have to offer listeners that they may not find 
elsewhere?

D.C. :
It wasn't planned, just turned out that way so far. 
I think the next release will not be based on a 
concept/theme but who knows? I honestly don't think 
that I bring anything new or special to the genre and 
don't try to. I just simply create what I create for 
selfish intentions. I feel like I am definitely 
beholden to my influences but try to bring my own 
personality into it. The one thing that I do strive 
for is to try and make each song have it's own 
identity. I get bored when every song sounds the same.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
What's a typical writing/recording process like for 
Abjection Ritual? You said you create for selfish 
intentions, What would those be if you don't mind 
sharing?

D.C. :
It depends...Sometimes I will have an idea of a 
specific mood, tempo or instrumentation, other times I 
just fiddle around with sounds until I find something 
that resonates with me. I also have to be in a certain 
head space to create. If I'm not in the right mood it 
will not work out. As far as the "selfish intentions" 
- I do this music both as a release and as a vehicle 
to explore some of my obsessions. It's therapeutic. 
If I don't have an outlet, I end up festering in my 
negativity and start treating those close to me like 
shit.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
You also mentioned that your influences have a great 
impact on you. Would you care to share which artists 
have had the greatest effect on yourself and your 
music? Are there things outside of the audio spectrum's 
that have had an influence your sound that are worth 
mentioning?

D.C. :
IRM, Brighter Death Now, MZ412, Grunt, Strom ec, 
Skin Chamber, Godflesh, Halo ,Swans, Neurosis, 
Bodychoke, Current 93, Joy Division, Sabbath, 
Eyehategod, Black Flag, Neubauten, The Birthday Party, 
Throbbing Gristle, Foetus......I could go on forever. 
Authors: Charles Bukowski, Celine, Brett Easton Ellis, 
Hubert Selby JR, Denis Johnson etc. I also read a ton 
of non-fiction as well.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
You seem to stick with challenging and grim subject 
matter, (Although this is common in the genre) What is 
it about topics like mental illness and existential 
despair that fascinate you and draw you in?

D.C. :
Mental Illness is something I have dealt with all of 
my life. In myself, family members, friends and even 
professionally when I worked in a group home for nine 
years. I have an aunt that lives in a State hospital. 
I've been around the mentally ill since I was born. 
I'm fascinated by abnormal psychology , particularly 
schizophrenics. When I say "existential despair" I 
refer to the state of living in a world with no higher 
purpose or meaning. Feeling insignificant and useless, 
at the mercy of the cold indifference of nature and 
the universe. If there is some kind of higher power it 
certainly doesn't intervene or have an interest in 
human affairs. I really like some of the writings of 
Sartre and Camus when it comes to this topic, in 
particular "Nausea" "No Exit" and "The Stranger." 



TRAUMATIC STATIC:
What are your thoughts on collaborating with other 
artists? Being that Abjection Ritual is such a 
personal project. Also for this same reason, How do 
you feel about playing live as Abjection Ritual? Do 
you think this type of music should be performed live?
Since it's not typically "Made to entertain" but 
rather, a personal outlet for many artists.

D.C. :
I'm definitely open to collaboration. I really enjoy 
listening to the collaborations on the various 
Malignant comps. Always a highlight in my opinion.
 I feel like the subject matter that I use is very 
similar to a lot of other acts in the genre. As far as 
playing live goes, I was completely against the idea 
when I first started but now have changed my mind. I 
am also working with someone else who can do visuals 
and additional soundscapes in the live setting. 
I completely agree that this music is not made to 
entertain but I also really like the feeling of 
blasting my work at full volume and screaming my head 
off, inflicting negative vibes on the "audience" and 
making people feel uneasy and anxious. These effects 
can really only happen to an audience that doesn't 
have prior knowledge of this genre and is expecting 
just another band to play. An industrial/power 
electronics/noise crowd are certainly not going to be 
shocked by any of this. I am open to performing in 
both situations though.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
Do you think it's possible to shock an audience these
days? Or even listeners with album content/art? Power 
Electronics and Death industrial are known for 
covering challenging subjects as you are well aware.
In an age where everything is available with the click 
of a mouse do you think there is any unexplored 
territory left?

D.C. :
No I don't think it is really possible to shock people 
these days beyond doing something insane such as 
suicide or murder during a performance. My aim is not 
to try and shock people but if that is their reaction 
then great. I am more interested in making them feel 
some of the emotions that I have put into the music. 
When I saw Neurosis when they were touring for Through 
Silver In Blood I had a very intense experience. 
During a song, they had a video loop of Bud Dwyer 
shooting himself and the intensity of the music 
coupled with that image freaked me out. I had to go 
outside for a minute to be honest. THAT is what 
interests me.

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
Do you use field recordings in your work? E.G. 
recordings gathered in locations like abandoned mental 
asylums/hospitals/etc? Or is Abjection Ritual more of 
a project that explores such mindsets mentally? Do you 
think incorporating such sounds aids to make a project 
more authentic, or do you see it as merely a gimmick?

D.C. :
I have not used any field recordings in my work and 
really do not have much of an interest in them. There 
are no interesting locations where I live that would 
yield such recordings either. I feel like an artist 
such as T.O.M.B. already has the whole haunted 
location/paranormal thing mastered to such great 
effect that anyone else attempting to do the same 
thing would seem like a pale imitation. It would be 
cool to record in a factory or warehouse for the 
ambiance/acoustics but I don't know if that would be 
considered a "field recording", ya know?

TRAUMATIC STATIC:
Thanks for taking the time to speak with us.
Are there any parting words, closing thoughts, or 
updates regarding your work that you'd like to share?

D.C. :
I'm in the process of working on a live set and have a 
friend/collaborator doing visuals and additional 
sounds for me. Anyone in the Pittsburgh, Cleveland or 
Buffalo area reading this and are interested in 
booking Abjection Ritual can email me at 
abjectionritual@yahoo.com. I would like to thank you 
for the interview and support! Hail Traumatic Static 
and Black Sheet Servitude!



YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION AS WELL AS THE MUSIC OF
ABJECTION RITUAL BY VISITING THE FOLLOWING LINKS:

https://www.facebook.com/Abjection-Ritual-
866453763375847/timeline/

https://abjectionritual.bandcamp.com/

https://soundcloud.com/.../futility-rites-by-
abjection-ritual-1

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